Pitfalls of Design and Build

I was reading the article by Rudi Klein in building magazine at the weekend (yes I still subscribe and get a paper version, old fashioned I know!) and his article HOW TO STAY OUT OF HELL about design risk.

Have to say he has a point doesn’t he? Why as an industry do we separate the design process from construction? As he says any manufacturer worth his salt wouldn’t separate design from manufacture.

But don’t you find that the design and build contract process is being abused?

Here’s a recent example to mull over….

Contractor calls our office: ‘I’ve got a potential contractual problem on a job, can you help me please?’

GFP: Well I’d like to think we can, tell me more….

Contractor: I’m trying to handover a job, and I’m having difficulties because the building was originally built in the wrong place!

GFP: Oh, now that is a problem, tell me more….

Contractor: You see we set the building out as the drawings and documents, all checked out ok on site, and then we looked at the proximity of some overhead power lines to where the imaginary building (as of then) would have been built. And well quite frankly we thought it wasn’t right.

GFP: What did you do? Tell me more……

Contractor: Well we sort advice from the design team who checked everything over and we were told we had built it in the right place. All as per the contract drawings. Except that nobody had considered the implications of the overhead power lines and the proximity to the building.

GFP: What happened next then? Tell me more….

Contractor: The design team worked out that we had to move the building. So we were instructed by way of a priced and agreed variation under the contract to carry out some remedial works so the building could be built in a different position (now not as the approved planning drawings). This we did and finished the building, albeit a bit later than scheduled. But as it turns out it was only relatively minor works to what we thought could have been a major problem. So we all felt quite pleased we’d come up with a good solution.

GFP So what’s the problem then? Tell me more….

Contractor: The client says it’s all our fault and won’t accept the building.

GFP: Why is that I don’t understand? Tell me more….

Contractor: I forgot to tell you it’s a design and build contract, the design team have been novated to us and as far as the client is concerned we are responsible for all of the design and the risk that goes with it.

GFP: Now I understand, I’m afraid we’ll have to look at what you’ve signed up to. Send us over some documents……

So who is right, and is it the Contractors fault?

To be continued……

1 Response to “Pitfalls of Design and Build”


  1. 1 Stephen Lynas June 7, 2011 at 11:21 pm

    Too true – clients want to have their cake and eat it when it comes to D&B projects!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 58 other followers

About Me

I’m now the Managing Director of Mynott Associates Limited my own specialist measurement business. I’ve been in the industry all of my life since I left school. My first job was with Bovis Construction as a management trainee where I trained to become a quantity surveyor. I’ve worked for contractors all through my career, I am FRICS, FCIOB and MCIHT qualified and act as an RICS assessor. I’m also a keen Arsenal supporter having followed them from a young boy

For more information, please click on my photo.

My Tweets

RSS The Construction Index News


%d bloggers like this: